Northwest Military Blogs: McChord Flightline Chatter

Posts made in: February, 2011 (22) Currently Viewing: 11 - 20 of 22

February 15, 2011 at 5:57am

446th Airlift Wing's Winter Wingman Day 2011

Reservists from the 446th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron here, participated in the Winter Wingman Day 2011 on Feb. 12. During the training session, maintainers creatively designed devices with straws and tape to protect an egg from a 10-foot drop. The conc




JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. -- Reservists from the 446th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron here, participated in the Winter Wingman Day 2011, sharing experiences and learning new skills to help cope with stress with an emphasis on mental, physical, social and spiritual health. The training on Feb. 12 offered a pause in the day-to-day mission to reinforce the Wingman concept, help build resilient Airmen, and focus on unit health, building a stronger, healthier, and safer Air Force.

The awareness training for the maintainers began with an introduction by Lt. Col. Luther Upton, 446th AMXS commander, who talked about the Wingman concept and the importance of realizing and utilizing support for Airmen.

"I like to think that the 446th AMXS truly buys-in to Wingman concept," said Colonel Upton. "I have seen our folks go to great pains to support their fellow Airmen and I really believe this is a big benefit for our unit members."

Following Colonel Upton's introduction, supervisors led smaller group sessions and facilitated the training by bringing personal experiences and sharing methods for coping with sources of stress like those from downrange missions and the poor economy, said Senior Master Sgt. Mark Cherrix, 446th AMXS section chief. 

One of the maintenance supervisors selected to lead the training was Master Sgt. Frank Jensen, 446th AMXS section chief, who facilitated dialogue in a small discussion group.

"We had really good discussion about confidence, making corrections versus dwelling on mistakes and having awareness of what you have control over," said Sergeant Jensen. "You can't push a brick wall but if you enlist a lot of people to help out you can take the brick wall down piece by piece and then move it." 

Ending the training session, maintenance groups built devices with plastic straws and masking tape creatively designed to protect an egg from a 10-foot drop, much like the Wingman concept and network of care provided to support Airmen dealing with stress in their lives.

"The Wingman Day training is very important and a worthwhile effort because the Air Force shows it cares about the Airman by spending the time to teach life skills like these," said Sergeant Jensen. "Being strong mentally, physically, socially and spiritually will help pad any fall an Airman may have," he said. "There are things that can be assessed and dealt with and there are things out of our control but either way, we're not alone."

February 16, 2011 at 6:06am

New Airmen center opens on McChord

Chief Master Sgt. Gregory Warren, right, 62nd Airlift Wing command chief, along with four Airmen, cut the ribbon to open the Airmen Activities Center Feb. 11 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. The new center, located in Bldg. 572, provides an alcohol-free

JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash.  -- The Airmen Activities Center opened Feb. 11 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. The new center provides an alcohol-free environment for Airmen to play video games, watch movies and build comprehensive fitness skills.    

February 16, 2011 at 6:07am

446th Security Forces Squadron Reservists train to dominate active shooters

MCCHORD FIELD, Wash.  -- When emotions runn high and guns blaze, the objective was crystal clear: to kill or cause serious harm to others before turning the trigger on himself or being taken down. Many law enforcement authorities across the United States categorize anyone having this approach as an active shooter. 

Because the active shooter phenomenon is unique, law enforcement agencies are developing new tactics, techniques and procedures to protect the public. Reservists with the 446th Security Forces Squadron are no exception. 

On Feb. 12, 2011, Tech. Sgts. Michael Pate and Rick Shumate, 446th Security Forces Squadron trainers, began a 48-hour training course specifically tailored for Reservists on how to neutralize active shooters on military installations around the world. Both sergeants recently completed the civilian-directed active shooting instructor course in Seattle. 

"We didn't have a structured active shooter training program," said Sergeant Pate, a uniformed security officer at The Boeing Company in Renton, Wash. "But the shootings at Fort Hood, Texas, and our own at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Lewis Main in 2009 brought it home that active shooter training was necessary." 

Sergeant Pate said the U.S. government saw an urgent need for agencies to create active shooter responder teams to stop and eliminate active shooters from causing harm to others. He added Reservists run the risk of not being selected to be part of an active shooter responder team if they didn't develop these skills. 

The sergeants said the U.S. military originally spearheaded the initial active shooter training, which civilian law enforcement communities tailored to suit their needs. They said they found it ironic the training has come back full circle and is now being tailored, or 'militarized' as they phrased it, to suit the military's needs. They added the 62nd SFS Airmen are receiving active shooter training with their counterparts at JBLM Lewis Main. 

According to Sergeant Shumate, 446th SFS RAVEN program manager (specially trained SFS personnel who provide security for Air Mobility Command aircraft that transit high terrorist and criminal threat areas), the training will run over upcoming UTA weekends and cover topics like initial responders' responsibilities and basic formations. Sergeant Shumate, a former Special Weapons and Tactics member of three years, said the training is specifically tailored for Reservists completing their drill weekends, annual tour, or on long-term orders.

"This training will get anyone, even those who don't even work in law enforcement on their civilian side, to develop the mindset that active shooting can happen and they have to act," said Sergeant Pate. "We have to go from patrolling the base to active shooter mode with a completely different mindset, quick." 

The sergeants said Reservists must move quickly from tactical thinking to aggressive action. They said although they know acting aggressively is outside the scope for many people, decisive and deliberate action is necessary to stop the threat of multiple deaths and/or fatalities, all the while knowing they themselves could be harmed or killed. 

Controlled speed, surprise and aggression: Watchwords Reservists must abide by, to win the battle against active shooters. 

"It's a highly dangerous mission, but we can't fail," said Sergeant Shumate.

February 17, 2011 at 8:28am

Congrats to Tech. Sgt. Oshawn Jefferson and Airman Leah Young




SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. -- AMC Public Affairs recently announced the winners of its 2010 Public Affairs Media Contest Awards. These annual awards recognize individuals and organizations who demonstrate excellence in telling the Air Force and AMC story through various public affairs processes and products, including print and broadcast journalism, photography, video, graphics and Web design.

The winners are:

Best News Article:
Tech. Sgt. Oshawn Jefferson, 62nd Airlift Wing, 1st Place;
Tech. Sgt. Parker Gyokeres, 621st Contingency Response Wing, 2nd Place;
Staff Sgt. Joseph Buzanowski, 92nd Air Refueling Wing, 3rd Place

Best Feature Article:
Tech. Sgt. Parker Gyokeres, 621st CRW, 1st Place; 
Tech. Sgt. Oshawn Jefferson, 62nd AW, 2nd Place;
Mr. Daniel Phoenix, 19th AW, 3rd Place

Best Sports Article:
Airman 1st Class Armando Schwier-Morales, 22nd ARW, 1st Place;
Airman Katherine Holt, 6th Air Mobility Wing, 2nd Place;
Senior Airman Natasha Stannard, 92nd ARW, 3rd Place

Best Commentary:
Staff Sgt. Joseph Buzanowski, 92nd ARW, 1st Place;
Airman 1st Class Dennis Sloan, 87th Air Base Wing, 2nd Place;
Senior Master Sgt. Sean Houlihan, 628th ABW, 3rd Place

Best Series: 
2nd Lieutenant Susan Carlson, 628th ABW, 1st Place;
Senior Airman David Carbajal, 87th ABW, 2nd Place;
22nd Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs, 3rd Place

Best Graphics Illustration:
Mr. Mark Diamond, Headquarters AMC, 1st Place;
Ms. Karen Petitt, 375th AMW, 2nd Place;
Mr. David W. Cushman, 60th AMW, 3rd Place

Best Graphics Animation:
Airman 1st Class Darek Baczewski, 6th AMW

Best Graphics Layout and Design:
Tech. Sgt. Laura Deckman, 621st CRW, 1st Place;
Staff Sgt. Ryan Crane, 375th AMW, 2nd Place;
Master Sgt. Scott Sturkol, Headquarters AMC, 3rd Place

Best Website:
375th AMW, 1st Place;
6th AMW, 2nd Place;
AMC Current Operations Division, Headquarters AMC, 3rd Place

Best Web-based Publication:
22nd ARW

Best Photojournalism:
Tech. Sgt. Parker Gyokeres, 621st CRW, 1st Place; 
Staff Sgt. Joseph Buzanowski, 92nd ARW, 2nd Place;
Staff Sgt. Joseph Swafford, 6th AMW, 3rd Place

Best Combat Documentation Photograph:
Tech. Sgt. J.T. May III, 92nd ARW, 1st Place;
Staff Sgt. Joseph Swafford, 6th AMW, 2nd Place;
Mr. James Bowman, 628th ABW, 3rd Place

Best News Photograph:
Senior Airman Timothy Taylor, 628th ABW, 1st Place;
Staff Sgt. Ryan Crane, 375th AMW, 2nd Place;
Master Sgt. Scott Sturkol, Headquarters AMC, 3rd Place

Best Feature Photograph:
Senior Airman Linzi Joseph, 6th AMW, 1st Place;
Mr. James Bowman, 628th ABW, 2nd Place;
Staff Sgt. Brian Valencia, 375th AMW, 3rd Place

Best Sports Photograph:
Senior Airman Natasha Stannard, 92nd ARW, 1st Place;
Staff Sgt. Joseph Swafford, 6th AMW, 2nd Place;
Mr. James Bowman, 628th ABW, 3rd Place

Best Portrait/Personality Photograph:
Tech. Sgt. Parker Gyokeres, 621st CRW, 1st Place; 
Senior Airman Timothy Taylor, 628th ABW, 2nd Place;
1st Lieutenant Nicholas Mercurio, 22nd ARW, 3rd Place

Best Illustrative Photography:
Staff Sgt. Angela Ruiz, 6th AMW, 1st Place;
Tech. Sgt. Jennifer Buzanowski, 92nd ARW, 2nd Place;
Tech. Sgt. Parker Gyokeres, 621st CRW, 3rd Place 

Best Pictorial Photograph:
Senior Airman Tristan English, 375th AMW, 1st Place;
Staff Sgt. Joseph Swafford, 6th AMW, 2nd Place;
Airman 1st Class Bryan Swink, 87th ABW, 3rd Place

Best Picture Story:
Staff Sgt. Ryan Crane, 375th AMW, 1st Place;
Staff Sgt. Angela Ruiz, 6th AMW, 2nd Place;
Staff Sgt. Chris Willis, 19th AW, 3rd Place

Best Radio News Report:
Tech. Sgt. Joseph Derr, 375th AMW

Best Radio Feature Report:
Tech. Sgt. Joseph Derr, 375th AMW

Best TV News Report:
Tech. Sgt. Casey Martin, 375th AMW

TV Feature Report:
Tech. Sgt. Joseph Derr, 375th AMW, 1st Place;
Airman 1st Class Darek Baczewski, 6th AMW, 2nd Place

Best Local TV Newscast:
"MacDill Matters," 6th AMW

Best Video Documentary:
6th AMW

Best Video Field Production:
Master Sgt. David DeRemer, 375th AMW

Outstanding New Writer:
Senior Airman Natasha Stannard, 92nd ARW, 1st Place;
Airman 1st Class Armando Schwier-Morales, 22nd ARW, 2nd Place;
Airman Leah Young, 62nd AW, 3rd Place

AMC Print Journalist of the Year:
Staff Sgt. Joseph Buzanowski, 92nd Air Refueling Wing, 1st Place;
Tech. Sgt. Oshawn Jefferson, 62nd Airlift Wing, 2nd Place;
Staff Sgt. Daniel Bowles, 628th ABW, 3rd Place

AMC Photographer of the Year:
Staff Sgt. Joseph Swafford, 6th AMW, 1st Place;
Tech. Sgt. J.T. May III, 92nd ARW, 2nd Place;
Staff Sgt. Ryan Crane, 375th AMW, 3rd Place

First-place winners go on to compete at the Air Force level with results to be announced later this year.

February 18, 2011 at 6:45am

Swarner named Bryce Lilly recipient

 Ken Swarner, co-owner of Swarner Communications was named the 2010 Bryce Lilly recipient by the 62nd Airlift Wing at McChord Field February 17, 2011.
   The 62nd chooses one person each year for the Bryce Lilly - Airmen, spouses, civil servants, community leaders are eligible.  The award, named after Bryce L. Lilly, a POW survivor from WWII and ardent supporter of the 62nd and McChord, is given to a person for his or her dedication and support of the 62nd Airlift Wing.
   "If I can even half-way measure up to our great Airmen and their families, then I am a proud man," said Swarner.  "I am so deeply touched that I have been able to honor the men and women of the 62nd Airlift Wing.  I am glad my efforts have touched them."
   Swarner was recognized for his work throwing support parties for military families, collecting welcome home baskets for returning warriors, his efforts as a founding member of the Pierce Military Business Alliance, raising tens of thousands of dollars to support military projects, his role as co-chairman of the Lakewood Area Chamber of Commerce's Military Affairs Committee, and as cubmaster for DuPont's Pack 472 where 2/3 of his cub scouts are from local military families.    

February 18, 2011 at 7:33am

McChord Airman nominated for 2010 Air Force ISR Award




SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. -- Officials from Air Mobility Command Headquarters here announced Feb. 16 the command's nominees for the 2010 Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, or ISR, Awards.

In a message from Col. Martin MacNabb, AMC's Director of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance at Scott AFB, he said "the competition was very close again this year." 

"All nominations reflected outstanding organizations and professionals, Colonel MacNabb said. "I commend all of their efforts. I would also like to thank the supervisors and commanders for their time and effort in nominating each of the 70 award nominations we received."

Following are the AMC winners/nominees:

-- Outstanding Active Duty ISR Airman of the Year -- Senior Airman Shaun T. Bryant, internal intelligence training manager, 62nd Operations Group, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

-- Outstanding OGI/OSF Intelligence Unit of the Year -- 19th Operations Group Intelligence, 19th Operations Group, Little Rock AFB, Ark. 

-- Outstanding ISRD/IOS/IS/RS Intelligence Unit of the Year -- Headquarters Air Mobility Command, Air Intelligence Squadron, Scott AFB, Ill. 

-- Outstanding Officer ISR Instructor of the Year - Capt. Joseph B. Tuzzolino, course director, Force Protection Intel Formal Training Unit, U.S. Air Force Expeditionary Center, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.

-- Outstanding Enlisted ISR Instructor of the Year - Tech. Sgt. Daina L. Singletary, NCO in charge, Intelligence Team, U.S. Air Force Expeditionary Center, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.

-- Outstanding Enlisted ISR Contributor of the Year -- Staff Sgt. Raymond P. Mansfield -- communications craftsman, 204th Intelligence Squadron (Air National Guard), Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.

Level I (for individuals assigned to numbered Air Force and above):

-- Outstanding ISR Senior-level Civilian of the Year -- Mr. Stephen H. Dawidowicz, chief of ISR Operations Division, AMC Air Intelligence Squadron, Scott AFB, Ill.

-- Outstanding ISR Intermediate-level Civilian of the Year -- Mr. Alexander M. McCormick, senior U.S. Central Command intelligence analyst, AMC Air Intelligence Squadron, Scott AFB, Ill. 

-- Outstanding Active Duty ISR Field Grade Officer of the Year - Maj. Tracy L. Moss, intelligence inspection chief, AMC Inspector General, Scott AFB, Ill. 

-- Outstanding Air Reserve Component ISR Field Grade Officer of the Year - Maj. Anthony J. Signore, deputy chief, ISR Operations Division, AMC Air Intelligence Squadron, Scott AFB, Ill. 

-- Maj. Gen. John S. Patton Outstanding Active Duty ISR Officer of the Year - Capt. Michael D. Berry, intelligence inspection deputy chief, AMC Inspector General, Scott AFB, Ill. 

-- Outstanding Air Reserve Component ISR Company Grade Officer of the Year -- Capt. Rolly D. Porter, chief, unit support, AMC Air Intelligence Squadron, Scott AFB, Ill.

-- Outstanding Active Duty ISR Senior NCO of the Year -- Senior Master Sgt. Michelle L. Brown, superintendent, Intelligence Operations, AMC Inspector General, Scott AFB, Ill.

-- Outstanding Active Duty ISR NCO of the Year -- Staff Sgt. Francisco R. Realegeno, U.S. Central Command Analysis Team, AMC Air Intelligence Squadron, Scott AFB, Ill. 

-- Outstanding Air Reserve Component ISR NCO of the Year -- Staff Sgt. Jamie T. Shirley, unit support analyst, AMC Air Intelligence Squadron, Scott AFB, Ill. 

-- Outstanding Active Duty ISR Airman of the Year -- Senior Airman Nathan L. Richard, command intelligence briefer, AMC Air Intelligence Squadron, Scott AFB, Ill.

Level II (for individuals assigned to wings and below):

-- Outstanding Active Duty Field Grade ISR Officer of the Year - Maj. Paul A. Pedersen, chief, wing intelligence, 437th Operations Group, Joint Base Charleston, S.C.

-- Outstanding Air Reserve Component ISR Field Grade Officer of the Year -- Lt. Col. Robert P. Andrews, intelligence operations officer, 145th Operations Group, Charlotte, N.C.

-- Maj. Gen. John S. Patton Outstanding Active Duty ISR Officer of the Year -- Capt. Karl A. Scheuerman, deputy chief of intelligence, 62nd Operations Group, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. 

-- Outstanding Air Reserve Component ISR Officer of the Year -- Capt. Michelle J. Bishop, deputy chief of intelligence, 89th Operations Group, Joint Base Andrews, Md. 

-- Outstanding Active Duty ISR Senior NCO of the Year -- Master Sgt. David M. Gaspar, Intel FTU section chief, 422nd Joint Tactics Squadron, U.S. Air Force Expeditionary Center, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.

-- Outstanding Active Duty ISR NCO of the Year -- Staff Sgt. Christopher R. Nichols, intelligence craftsman, 30th Airlift Squadron, Cheyenne, W.Y.

-- Outstanding Air Reserve Component ISR NCO of the Year -- Tech. Sgt. Corrina J. Bartels, intelligence operations analyst, 155th Operations Group, Lincoln, Neb.



February 19, 2011 at 5:16am

Story at a Glance • At the 4th Airlift Squadron, officers, enlisted and civilians work together in order to develop and sustain expeditionary airmen to deliver global airlift for America. Photos 1 of 3 Andrew Roberts, 4th Airlift Squadron unit prog

Andrew Roberts, 4th Airlift Squadron unit program coordinator, speaks to mission planners about training requirements Feb. 16 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. At the 4th AS, civilians, enlisted and officers work together to deliver global airlift for Am




JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash.  -- It may take two to tango, but it takes three types of people to deliver global airlift for America.

At the 4th Airlift Squadron, officers, enlisted and civilians work together in order to develop and sustain expeditionary airmen to deliver global airlift for America.

"We safely execute our combat airlift mission at maximum velocity by utilizing all opportunities for realistic training while taking care of the Fightin' Fourth Family," said Lt. Col. Rodney Lewis, 4th AS commander.

As part of that family, Staff Sgt. Beau Messenger, 4th AS loadmaster instructor, explained how the squadron would not be able to function without teamwork and joint efforts.

"From the time that we enter our training program, it is ingrained in us that we each hold an equal position on the jet," said Sergeant Messenger. "The pilots and loadmasters have equal responsibility in terms of delivering the mission. That attitude carries over to our office jobs and I can really see the same culture apply even while we're not flying."

Sergeant Messenger is responsible for monitoring his fellow loadmasters in flight and ensuring their performance meets compliance standards. 

"As an instructor, I fly with them to keep their training current and up to date," said Sergeant Messenger. "To keep the squadron's performance up to par, I personally ensure every loadmaster is able to perform the way they need to."

Meeting the compliance standards would not be possible without the help of the civilian force, maintaining continuity and training records while the busy aircrew delivers the various missions.

"The civilians are the backbone of the squadron," said Andrew Roberts, 4th AS unit program coordinator and retired master sergeant. "We're the ones who stay here and keep track of everything while they're gone."

Before the squadron deployed in August of 2010, Roberts held the unit training manager position consecutively for four years. 

"I was responsible for keeping all training records up to date and making sure the Airmen were current," said Mr. Roberts. "There are only four civilians in the squadron, and our positions are civilian for a reason. Imagine how crazy and inconsistent the training records would be if the person in charge of them is gone for two weeks at a time."

As a former enlisted Airman, Mr. Roberts said he understands the importance of teamwork and he's glad to see another perspective.

"Some days I miss enlisted life, some days I love civilian life," said Mr. Roberts. "No matter which way you look at it, no matter what side you're on, you all have to work together. We're all pieces of the puzzle. The mission would be incomplete without all the pieces."

The third and final pieces to the airlift squadron puzzle are the pilots. According to Capt. Nathan Moseley, 4th AS pilot, successfully completing his duties would not be possible without the help of his enlisted and civilian coworkers. 

"I wouldn't be able to fly the plane without them," said Captain Moseley. "We work together while in flight and at the squadron to complete the missions accurately and safely."

During his non-flying days at the squadron, Captain Moseley is an executive officer to the commander and is responsible for items such as monitoring performance reports. Although executive duties are imperative, he says the itch to fly is unavoidable. 

"As a squadron, we fly anywhere from seven to ten local missions a week," said Captain Moseley. "We try to get on as many flights as we can while keeping our executive duties balanced. There are some days where my window overlooks the runway, and some days it's overlooking the clouds at 10,000 feet in the air." 

Whether it's a pilot flying the plane, a loadmaster scheduling the flight or a civilian maintaining the record, every member of the squadron can agree that teamwork is vital, and the 4th AS is a family. 

"The fourth is an awesome squadron," said Sergeant Messenger. "When we come back from a long mission, it just feels like coming home. We're a great big family. I'm very thankful that I ended up here."

February 21, 2011 at 7:00am

446th AW maintainer answers own call of duty with 10 deployments

Master Sgt. Brian Lidyard (center) stands with Ugandan troops in a control tower in Iraq, Jan. 21, 2011 during his 120-day deployment. This was Sergeant Lidyard's 10th deployment in his Reserve career. The Puyallup, Wash. resident has been with the 446th




MCCHORD FIELD, Wash -- Most Reservists have their reasons for joining the Air Force Reserve. For some it may be for the education and training. For others, it could be the satisfaction of serving their country on a part-time basis while being able to work as a civilian and live in their hometown. But many just simply want to serve their country the best they can.

A prime example is a Reservist in the 446th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, who "walks his talk" about serving in the Air Force and having the will to make a difference for the United States, despite the sacrifices he makes during the process.

Master Sgt. Brian Lidyard, 446th AMXS expeditor, has been with the 446th Airlift Wing since 1981 and has been through 10 deployments since 2002. He just returned from his most recent tour in Iraq in January.

"Brian brings a lot to the table with his experience," said Lt. Col. Luke Upton, 446th AMXS commander. "He lives the (Air Force) Core Values and gets chosen for deployments because of his experience and his willingness to serve." 

Sergeant Lidyard volunteered for all but one of his deployments, which was a short-notice deployment in 2005.

"I was informed that I'd be going on a deployment to Iraq and I needed to be ready to leave in 48 hours," said the Boeing functional test technician.

Sergeant Lidyard explains why he volunteers.

"Deep down, I am very patriotic," he said. "Plus, I want to make my Reserve career mean the most it can to me and my country and I want my family to be proud of me."

Speaking of family, his wife of 31 years and three sons support his choice to serve in the Reserve.

"My wife knows the passion I have to serve my country," said Sergeant Lidyard. "When I was activated in 2002, deployments were new to me and my family, so we all had to learn together. With my wife and kids being so supportive, it only makes us grow stronger when I am away."

Just one of the battles he had to deal with on the home front while he was away was dealing with his mother's fight with cancer, not once, but twice.

"My mother was diagnosed with cancer twice, four years apart," he said. "They were both during deployments, but she has survived. My mother was conditioned to deployments with my father being a retired Marine. She never once wanted me to stay behind. She is a fighter."

Sergeant Lidyard's military coworkers admire his dedication.

"His work ethic is stellar," said Senior Master Sgt. Cameron Pence, 446th AMXS Aircraft Maintenance Unit superintendent. "He's a force multiplier. Not only do we know that he's going to spend the energy to be the best that he can at it, but he's going to take everybody around him and make them better at what they do. He makes an impact that's bigger than he is."

Chief Master Sgt. Steve Slagle, 446th AMXS superintendent, gets a sense of relief when Sergeant Lidyard goes to deploy, because he knows the job will get done.

"It's one less thing you have to worry about if you deploy with a guy like him," said the Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspector. "You know things will be taken care of and run smoothly. It gives you a higher level of confidence."

Sergeant Lidyard's civilian career hasn't suffered from his Reserve commitment. In fact, the people at his job have been supportive.

"Boeing has gone above and beyond what is required and leadership has always been supportive," he said. "I have never had any issues with Boeing while I'm on orders. My direct supervisors Facebook me while I'm gone and keep in touch, so that's always good."

Sergeant Lidyard has words of advice for younger Airmen who haven't deployed or who are deploying for the first time.

"Learn as much as you can at all times," said the 30-plus-year veteran. "You never know when you will get that call to deploy without notice, or if a chance comes along to volunteer."

Although he filed his retirement papers to end on the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001, he does wonder about giving up his service in the Reserve.

"I submitted my retirement papers a few months ago," he said. But I ask myself if I am really ready to not serve anymore. If I am not willing to deploy anymore, maybe it's time to retire and let someone else have my stripe."

Overall, Sergeant Lidyard has no qualms with his service.

"I have no regrets in serving my country and deploying," said the Puyallup, Wash. resident. "If it was not for my wife, sons, and their strong faith ... I would have never been able to do this much."

Sergeant Lidyard's deployments since 2002:

1.  Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, April to July 2002
2.  Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan, September 2002 to January 2003
3.  Charleston Air Force Base, S.C. (Operation Iraqi Freedom build up), February to May 2003
4.  Germany, May to June 2003
5.  Southwest Asia, September to November 2003
6.  Germany, September 2004 to January 2005
7.  Iraq, September to December 2005
8.  Afghanistan, September to December 2006
9.  Operation Deep Freeze, November 2007
10. Iraq, September 2010 to January 2011

February 21, 2011 at 6:26pm

Top Airmen at McChord

The eighth Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force, Sam Parish, with annual award recipients and first sergeants at the 2010 Annual Awards Banquet Feb. 17 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Twelve awards were received in categories such as Non Commissioned




JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash.  -- Congratulations to the following members of Team McChord who earned awards at the 2010 Annual Awards Banquet Feb. 17 at McChord Field, Wash. The awards were presented by the eighth Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force, Sam Parish. 

Key Spouse
Mrs. Rebecca Scogin, 10th Airlift Squadron

Civilian Category Ia
Mr. Wesley Littleton, 62nd Aerial Port Squadron

Civilian Category Ib
Mr. Anthony Bamba, 62nd Maintenance Group

Civilian Category IIb
Ms. Jessica Smith, 62nd Comptroller Squadron

Civilian Category III
Mr. Norman Fernaays, 62nd Civilian Personnel Office

Airman
Senior Airman Jesse Hughes, 62nd CPTS

Non Commissioned Officer
Staff Sgt. Mark Walker, 627th Civil Engineer Squadron

Senior Non Commissioned Officer
Master Sgt. Kevin Bradt, 627th Logistics Readiness Squadron

First Sergeant 
Master Sgt. Kristy Frost, 62nd Operations Group

Junior Company Grade Officer
1st Lt. Christopher Ellingson, 62nd CPTS

Company Grade Officer
Maj. Matthew Olson, 627th CES

Honor Guard
Airman 1st Class Kali Ackles, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron

February 22, 2011 at 5:04pm

McChord Airmen in New Zealand during earthquake

MCCHORD FIELD, Wash.- About 35 McChord Airmen, 15 of them Reservists from the 446th Airlift Wing, are in Christchurch, New Zealand where a 6.3-magnitude earthquake hit Feb. 22.

Based in Christchurch with their C-17 Globemaster III to support Operation Deep Freeze, the Airmen are all accounted for and uninjured. Likewise, the C-17 escaped any damage, although today's mission has been delayed.

"We had people in the hotel, at the airport, downtown, at stores when the earthquake hit," said Chief Master Sgt. James Masura, 446th Operations Group and currently deployed to Christchurch.

"The airport has power, so we have some of our folks there powering up their computers, checking the news and just standing by," the chief said.

According to Col. Lane Seaholm, 446th AW vice commander, the Airmen from McChord are currently waiting for instruction from higher headquarters as to what they'll be doing next.

"We're ready and willing to provide any assistance requested of us by higher headquarters. We had a mission set for today to carry 40 people and nine pallets in support of Operation Deep Freeze, but that's on hold," Colonel Seaholm said by phone from Christchurch.

Colonel Seaholm said that he's never been through an earthquake this big.

"It's quite an emotional event," he said. "Most everyone here has at least touched based with their families back home to let them know we're all okay."

Operation Deep Freeze is an annual operation that supports the U.S. Antarctic Program and the National Science Foundation's research at sites throughout the Antarctic continent. The Joint Task Force - Support Forces Antarctica operation is led by 13th Air Force and includes strategic inter-theater airlift, tactical deep-field support, aeromedical evacuation support, search and rescue response, sealift, seaport access, bulk fuel supply, port cargo handling and transportation requirements.


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