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November 25, 2014 at 2:57pm

Beer Here: ParkWay The Destroyer, Engine House No. 24, lot of Lagunitas ...

Happy Thanksgiving!

Every Thanksgiving, they pack their bags and head back to the South Sound for turkey dinner at grandma's house. Here are the joints where you can meet the ones who love craft beer. ...

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 26

For some, the night before Thanksgiving can be a greater cause for celebration than the holiday itself - an opportunity to return to the old stomping grounds, imbibe oneself with threatening amounts of beer and play catch-up with some forlorn acquaintances. The Puyallup River Alehouse provides the venue. Widmer Brothers provides the beer ... and some raffle prizes ... from 6-9 p.m.

In the name of Thanksgiving, let us give thanks for the following: Alesmith Speedway Stout, Epic Big Bad Baptist, 2013 Deschutes Abyss, Freemont Darkstar, Great Divide Choc Oak Aged Yeti, Mad Viking Night Raid, 2013 Avery Mephistopheles, Lost Abbey Angel's Share Grand Cru, Maritime Jolly Roger 2012 & 2013, Great Divide Hibernation, Almanac Heirloom Pumpkin Barleywine, Boneyard Orange is the New Jack, 2013 Widmer Ginger Brrbon, 2013 He'Brew Funky Jewbelation, Deschutes Jubel Ale on Nitro, Hop Valley Mistress of the Dark, New Belgium Le Terroir, The Bruery Seven Swans a Swimming, Dogfish Head 60, 90, & 120 min, Fremont The Brother, Boneyard Notorious, Laurelwood Megafauna, Boneyard Bone-a-fide and Finn River Cranberry Rosehip Cider. Those are the beers the ParkWay Tavern will pour at its annual "Honey, The ParkWay Ruined Thanksgiving Once Again!" launching at 5 p.m. This is one of the ParkWay's most popular events of the year. It has ruined many a Thanksgiving.

Those up for a road trip should venture to the city of Pacific for Northwest Brewing Company's Pre-Thanksgiving Day Party from noon to 10 p.m. Drink a pint of Foggy Goggles Stout and you could win a growler full of the brew every hour. Expect chili.

FRIDAY, NOV. 28

Skip the Black Friday craziness and dine with 7 Seas Brewing at Brix 25. This four-course meal will pair the culinary prowess of The Gig Harbor fine-dining restaurant with damn tasty brews from 7 Seas for $50 a head. This 6 p.m. dinner will sell out; reservations are required at 253.858.6626.

MONDAY, DEC. 1

"Do not open till Christmas" should never apply to beer. Each day from Dec. 1 through Dec. 24, Engine House No. 9 will be releasing a different specialty bottle or tap beer; follow along and feel the Christmas spirit in your veins.

TUESDAY, DEC. 2

Hard cider is the kindest of alcoholic beverages. Beer must be cumbersomely boiled, wine is expensive and poorly distilled spirits can blow up and fry your eyes. They all involve so much waiting. Cider is a relative cakewalk. Find out if this is true when Number 6 Cider out of Seattle launches its brand at The Red Hot Tuesday night.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 3

99 Bottles will unleash a massive beet tasting with Skyler Cesarone of Lagunitas Brewing Company of Petaluma, California. Cesarone will pour nearly every beer from Lagunitas, from 5-7 p.m. The tasting fee is $2.

Epic Brewing Company, a Salt Lake City brewery founded in 2008, will pay a visit to the Puyallup River Alehouse from 6-9 p.m. No word is the Epic Big Bad Baptist Imperial Stout, aka the Beast, will be making an appearance. Know this the pitch-black beer rings in at 11.8 percent ABV.

November 24, 2014 at 2:51pm

Thanksgiving beer pairings

Pint Defiance assistant manager R.J. Adler suggest these four beers with your Thanksgiving meal. Photo courtesy of R.J. Adler

Cruelly sandwiched in between two much cooler holidays, the fourth Thursday in November has always been a bit of a letdown for me. Maybe I just had to draw one too many handprint turkeys and write too many lists of things to be thankful for when I was a kid. I promised myself that I wouldn't write anything this cheesy, but right now I've got an early deadline bearing down on me like a Mack truck.

To most folks, beer makes a Thanksgiving appearance during the afternoon football games rather than the big meal. Here in the South Sound, we can do better. We can bring craft beer to the dinner table, and we can show our relatives how wonderfully it can pair with food.

But pairing beer on Thanksgiving can be tricky. For starters, a turkey has both light and dark meat. There's also usually a sweet cranberry sauce and a savory stuffing along with a veritable smorgasbord of sides, rendering the heaviness of a porter too much, and snuffing out any flavor from light session ale. To address the conundrum, I dropped by Pint Defiance Specialty Beers and Taproom for assistant manager R.J. Adler's suggestions for the best holiday pours. Sundays at Pint Defiance are traditionally a four-beer tester flight tagged with a theme. This past Sunday, Adler skipped the sampler and poured full pints of beers he suggests for a Thanksgiving meal.

With a world full of comparable options, Adler chose four beers he thought people should know, based on four courses of a Thanksgiving meal: cheese, starter dishes, the main meal and dessert.

First Course: Unitroué Ephemera Cranberry (Chambly, Quebuec, Canada, 5.5 percent alcohol by volume)

"Brewed in the tradition of a Belgian White ale, this top-fermented beer provides a perfect warm-up for your palate to prepare it for a Thanksgiving feast," says Alder. "It pours a slightly cloudy blonde color releasing a flowery bouquet of red berries. The flavor is slightly sweet with a minor tart acidity that wakes up the taste buds but leaves little linger. The Unitroupe pairs nicely with soft cheeses."

Second Course: Lost Abbey Red Barn Ale (San Marcos, California, 6.7 percent ABV)

"This Farmhouse Ale traces its roots to the small rustic breweries of Southern Belgium," says Alder. "The word ‘Saison' comes to us from the French language and it means ‘season.' Lightly spiced with organic ginger, orange peels, black pepper and grains of paradise, the flavors complement holiday starters such as savory salads, barbecue beef or pork, or spicy dishes."

Main Course: DuPont Avec Les Bons Voeux (Trourpes, Belgium, 9.5 percent ABV)

Nov. 13 marked the official day (and night) of the Coast to Coast Toast. Vanberg & DeWulf, who founded the Coast to Coast Toast three years ago, was the first company to specialize in importing Belgian beers to the U.S. The principals of Vanberg & DeWulf (Don Feinberg and Wendy Littlefield) have been tireless champions for Belgian beer and now "honorary Belgians" all from independent family-run producers. Those who participated in the Coast to Coast Toast, which included Adler raising and tipping a DuPont Avec Les Bons Voeux - know this Vanberg & Dewulf imported brew to be worthy.

"Since 1970, the (Brasserie Dupont) brewery has been brewing a special beer to give as a New Year's present to their best clients - the name of this beer translates as, ‘With the best wishes of the brewery DuPont'," says Adler. "This strong pale ale pours a coppery blonde with a frothy white head introducing aromas of fresh baked bread, delicate lemon and a mild herbal happiness. It pairs excellently with turkey, salty dishes and rich food, with a subtle warming sensation from the alcohol and a clean, crisp finish that prepares the palate for the next bite."

Dessert Course: Kasteel Winter (Ingelmunster Begium, 11 percent ABV)

"Kasteel Winter is a unique departure from the stars winter ales known for their potpourri of cinnamon and clove," says Adler. "This Belgian Strong Dark pours a chestnut brown with a nose of rich, warm coffee, toffee and dried fruits. The mouthfeel is rich and sweet like that of melted candy thanks to the addition of Belgian chocolate and coffee. This brew could be a dessert on its own but pairs great with rich, earthy-dry desserts, dark chocolate and mint."

By far, the Kasteel Winter was the favorite beer at Pint Defiance Sunday, with the Dupont coming in second, followed by the Unibroue and finally the Lost Abbey ale. Those who agreed with Adler and purchased the four beers for family and friends Thursday might just drink dessert first. The Kasteel Winter is that tasty.

Adler suggests letting the last two beers warm to room temperature to bring out four flavors. As I interview him, he cupped the glasses housing my Dupont and Kasteel, refusing to let me taste them before reaching the optimum temperature.

And what does Adler suggest you drink during the football games before the big meal?

"I suggest a session beer that's not going to ruin your palate," he says. "Maybe a Northwest-style pale ale, such as a Bale Breaker Field 41 Pale Ale or a Goodlife Sweet As Pacific Ale."

PINT DEFIANCE, 2049 Mildred St. W., Tacoma, 253.302.4240

Filed under: New Beer Column, Holidays, Tacoma,

November 19, 2014 at 11:19am

Beer Here: Hop Valley Brewing, The Red Hot vs Japan, Hops For Hope, dark beers, Harmon beer dinner ...

Rob Brunsman chats up Hop Valley brewing at Pint Defiance tonight. Photo credit: Pappi Swarner

October has the German celebration of beer. November has the American feast to end all feasts. If only there was a way to merge the two months into one long, gluttonous season. Octember might be a figment of my imagination, but Novem-Beer isn't. Drink up South Sound. ...

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 19

Lane County, Oregon, is in a yeasty beer boom. Whiteaker, Oakshire, Ninkasi, Plank Town, Viking Braggot, Claim 52, Falling Sky and Hop Valley Brewing Co. are just a few of the breweries keeping Eugene and Springfield on a constant beer run. Pint Defiance Specialty Beers & Taproom picked Hop Valley from the notable beer region for a night of beers and prizes from 5-7 p.m. Eugene native and brewmaster Trevor Howard opened Hop Valley Brewing Friday, Feb. 13, 2009. Indeed, he and his father, Ron Howard, Jonas Kungys and Chuck Hare chose Friday the 13th. Good luck has only come their way, as Hop Valley has undergone incredible growth. The growth should continue as Hop Valley hired Rob Brunsman, the funniest man in beer, to rep Washington state. Join Brunsman for such Hop Valley brews as Alphadelic IPA, Double-D Blonde, Mistress of the Dark Black IPA and Smokin' Porter.

Japan's Kiuchi Brewery was established in 1823 as a sake brewery. In 1996, they began brewing beer under the Hitachino Nest label, and have since produced a range of well-regarded, tasty beers. Their White Ale, a wheat beer spiced with coriander and curacao orange peel in the Belgian style, is top notch, and certainly on par with the best Belgian representatives of this classic style. The Red Hot offers a flight of four Hitachino beers today.

Iron Horse Brewery - the Ellensburg, Washington, brewery that loves to party - will bring a bunch of beer and schwag to The Swiss from 6-9 p.m.

Puyallup River Alehouse hosts North Coast Brewing Company out of Fort Bragg, California, for a night of Blue Star Wheat Beer, Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout, Acme California IPA and other brews, plus schwag giveaways from 6-9 p.m.

McMenamins Spar Café celebrates the Terminator Stout's 29th birthday with $3 pints all day. Expect Terminator floats and chili dogs, too.

THURSDAY, NOV. 20

Over by Pacific Lutheran University, beer geek Erick Swenson will offer a German beer sampler at 208 Garfield for $6 a person, beginning at 6 p.m. 

Top Rung Brewing will run its Trashed Pumpkin through a Randall loaded with coffee beans.

Narrows Brewing Co. hosts Hops For Hope, a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. Grab a pint of the new Turkish Coffee Stout from 6-9 p.m. and maybe your raffle ticket will land you a prize.

FRIDAY, NOV. 21

The Copper Door hosts a Movember fundraiser beginning at 6 p.m. For every pint sold, a dollar will be earmarked for The Movember Foundation to fight prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health issues. Expect a raffle with Movember schwag.

Gig Harbor icon Finholm's Market and Grocery will host Narrows Brewing Co. for a brewer's night from 5-7 p.m.

SATURDAY, NOV. 22

Wingman Brewers knows you need a malty, roasty, chocolatey barrel-aged hug - the warmest snuggle-buddy in all the land - during these cold times. In celebration of their Stratofortress and Bourbon Barrel Stratofortress Belgian Strong Dark Ale style beer releases, Wingman has created a mini festival of darkness and deliverance. In addition to Team Stratofortress, and hauling out its other dark beer goodness, Wingman has invited a few fellow winter beers - some equally dark and strong as the Stratofortresses. Wingman calls the event Denizens of the Dark. From 2-11 p.m. the Tacoma Brewery will offer dark ones: Stratofortress, Bourbon Barrel Stratofortress, Jack' o Fortress, Chocofortress, Bourbon Barrel Big Baby Flat Top, Bourbon Barrel P-51 Porter, Oak Aged Heavy Bevvy Scotch Ale, 2013 Stratofortress (limited bottle release) as well as Lost Abbey Bourbon Angels Share, Alesmith Speedway Stout, 2013 Dogfish Head World Wide Stout, 2013 The Bruery 6 Geese-A-Laying, Epic Brewing Big Bad Baptist, North Coast Old Stock, Pelican Barrel Aged Poire and 2013 Scaldis Noel. Seven bucks scores you a commemorative Cthulhu snifter and your first pour.

TUESDAY, NOV. 25

As one of the lucky few who can claim every meal eaten out as a tax deduction, I don't have much incentive to spend time in the kitchen. Even the prospect of guests to impress doesn't tempt me to start cooking, since I'm acutely aware of how many more talented epicureans are practicing their art in the South Sound, including Bar Bistro's executive Chef Jason Blessum. Bar Bistro hosts a five-course beer-pairing dinner with the Harmon Brewing Co. For $35, you'll receive an ahi crostini with a Hop ‘N Rye beer cocktail, braised pork belly with the Black Tartan CDA, pork tenderloin with the new Fall Ball Imperial Red and other treats, beginning at 6 p.m. Reserve your space at 253.537.3655.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 26

For some, the night before Thanksgiving can be a greater cause for celebration than the holiday itself - an opportunity to return to the old stomping grounds, imbibe oneself with threatening amounts of beer and play catch-up with some forlorn acquaintances. The Puyallup River Alehouse provides the venue. Widmer Brothers provides the beer ... and some raffle prizes ... from 6-9 p.m.

November 17, 2014 at 10:28am

Beer science and history with Three Magnets Brewing's head brewer Pat Jansen

Three Magnets Brewing's head brewer Pat Jansen checks the status of his sours in his barrel room. Photo credit: Pappi Swarner

For a high schooler with designs on coolness, there's only one peer-sanctioned response to a long lecture on organic chemistry: boredom. Notebook doodling, loud gaping yawns - perhaps even a head slumped on the desk, for good measure - until, of course, the instructor drops organic chemistry lab phrases such as "three-way stop-cock" and "prying open the bung hole," then you laugh along ensuring fellow teenage classmates there isn't some geeky girl-repelling chemistry kit in your closet.

Yet, there's always that one kid in class who views the science as more essential than oxygen. That kid grows up to be a head brewer at Three Magnets Brewing Co. in Olympia.

Science mystifies Americans, while art seduces them. It's a phenomenon that Pat Jansen - head brewer and local sourcing liaison at Three Magnets - has a hold on both. Having studied soil chemistry for 10 years, Jansen knows how soil pH levels ultimately affect beer and other science behind brewing beer - and by science I mean he knows the isomerization path of a-acids into iso-a acids during the boiling stage of brewing - the chemical breakdown of humulone into isohumulone - as one of many examples. It's gaping yawn garble unless Jansen is disseminating the subject. He's a one-man show. Hands are flying. His body jerks and twists. His face morphs through 15 different expressions. He shows great passion in brewing beer.

I've been Jansen's audience member twice now. Once, during a Three Magnets brewer's night at Dillingers Cocktails and Kitchen, down the street from the brewery, and a second time Thursday night on a progress tour of the brewery, which has opened - the brewing and bar side of the business are in operation while construction continues on the family dining section. Jansen's stage show was restricted to body gestures at Dillingers due to space constrictions. Inside the brewery, I had to run to keep within listening distance. At one point, Jansen had Three Magnets co-owner Nate Reilly, assistant brewer and bar manager Jeff Stokes, kitchen manager Nancy Bickell and Weekly Volcano sales executive Nikki McCoy and I performing in his stage production, The Barrel-Aged Bung Hole Peek Conga Line. Early review: It's a lively production that should produce some tasty cherry and currant cherry sour ales down the road.

While Three Magnets has a Farmhouse Saison named after Helsing Junction Farm in Thurston County and an Autumnal Saison on tap, most of the farmhouse and Belgian-style beers brewing at the downtown Olympia brewery are for future barrel projects.

"The goal is to put them in barrels and age, to be reinoculated with wild yeast or fruit or a combination of what lives on the fruit with wild yeast," says Jansen. "I have been waiting for the first frost, which means the bacteria load in the air will die and stop reproducing and lose its aggressiveness. Bacteria will tolerate 110, 120, 130 degree temperatures. Yeast will tolerate down to freezing. Bacteria, however, doesn't like freezing temperatures. Once we get to the freezing point, I can take raw wort from a brew, take it up on to the roof of the brewery, and set it in large shallow pans to start collecting cold tolerant wild yeast and bacteria - which means we can make indigenous sour beer, instead of buying cultures from a lab." (If you could only see the short jump and raised hands during this speech.)

The 14 barrels in Three Magnet's auxiliary room have purchased or home-procured wild yeast and wild yeast from fruit. Most of the barrels are from Doug McCrea's Salida Winery in Thurston County, with a couple from Columbia Crest. The room, located off the open kitchen and behind the family dining area, will eventually house spirits barrels too, with the barrels arranged to allow tastings and other private functions.

Running Beer Man

In addition to brewing, Jansen also shows passion for brewing history, especially old English beers and traditional brewing processes. He's interested in making "real ale," and running a firkin off the countertop in the brewery's bar area.

"In the 1700s and 1800s, British brewers were making pale ales, bitter beers and porters," explains Jansen. "In the 1900s, technology allowed for stewing malts - to create crystal malts, which means coffee and toffee forward malts, red fruit character malts - red cherries and currants, and purple character malts such as prunes and figs. And the British made a beer that you could make quickly and drink it fresh. They were called running beers. ...

"Anyway, because the UK beer market began pushing products of low flavor and overall quality onto the consumer, such as Budweiser and Stella Artois, four stodgy British guys basically said, ‘we need to form a society, and petition the government and save traditional-styled beers.'" (Jansen made a stodgy facial expression during this explanation.)

Campaign for Real Ale, or CAMRA, was formed in March 1971 by the four men from the northwest of Britain to save traditional, flavorsome beers promoting fermentation in the cask from which they were served and give British beer drinkers a better variety and choice at the bar. CAMRA's core aims are to promote real ale and pubs, as well as act as the consumer's champion in relation to the UK and European beer and drinks industry.

Jansen explained that toward the end of the 19th century, brewers built large estates of tied pubs. They moved away from vatted beers stored for many months and developed "running beers" that could be served after a few days storage in pub cellars. Draught Mild was a "running beer" along with a new type that was dubbed "Bitter" (3.4-3.9 percent ABV) by drinkers. Bitter grew out of Pale Ale but was generally deep bronze to copper in color due to the use of slightly darker malts such as crystal that give the beer fullness of palate. "Best" (4 percent and higher) is a stronger version of Bitter but there is considerable crossover.

Jansen explained the tradition of blending back-aged beer into young beer went away in the early decades of the 20th century, mostly eliminated after the two World Wars. In Britain, the running beers gave birth to the cask movement but, generally, no blending of old beer with young is done.

"Rodenbach beer (Flemish Red ale) is probably the closest beer around to traditional English porters these days. Rodenbach pasteurizes the beer so it doesn't turn and get sour or tart."

Jansen began telling the story of Rodenbach and Eugene Rodenbach, grandson of the founders, who traveled to England to learn about barrel aging and blending from English porter brewers. The methods Eugene learned, while no longer in use in England, are still used by Rodenbach today. Rodenbach is known as a "mixed fermentation" beer, meaning it's fermented with a mix of regular ale yeast and a cocktail of wild yeast and bacteria. This mixture then goes into large wooden barrels called foeders. ...

"OK, back to running beer ... the tradition in Britain wasn't to keg off beer and push it with CO2 because during the war there wasn't a lot of it around due to conversation, so they took beer from a large tank right before it finishes fermenting so there is just enough sugar to carbonate the beer, then put them into metal casks, sometimes wood casks, bung it for a pressure seal," Jansen explains. "For example, if you let our Smoked English Porter sit for a half-hour it would taste like a freshly tapped cask of British style beer would taste like back in the day - low carbonation, around fifty degrees warm."

The British brewers would make the beer, put it in a cask, and ship it out to the publican - the keeper of a public house or tavern. Then, the publican would finish the brewing process by aging the beer properly and placing it on the bar counter and presenting it properly.

"Today, the brewers have to do that work because the American consumer wants aged beer," says Jansen.

Two casks, or firkins, currently sit on Three Magnet's bar. Jansen hopes to launch a firkin program in several weeks. He's still pondering on the correct way to proceed.

"There are two ways of doing it," he says. "If you know you have a crowd that can kill a cask quickly because they want it or have a bartender who can actually sell beer worth a damn, you can actually put the cask on and sell it over a three-day period - because that's the amount of time before oxidation affects the character of the beer. After that, it gets really cardboard-y, a little too over sherry-ish and you get vinegar. It's terrible.

"The second way to run a cask is to put a cask breather on it where you get a slow blanket of CO2 on it and you're not over carbonating it, and continues to present the right way for a week."

Jansen has taken his interests and binary compounds and brewed an exceptional Smoked English Porter and Brewers Best English Pale with Jeff Stokes, who often acted as an interpreter during Jensen's lightning-fast verbal dissertations. Also on tap are a Rye Meridian, Citra Wet Hop Ale, Mosaic + Citra Wet Hop Ale, Session IPA, Rainy Day IPA - named after Rainy Day Records -  and Brotherhood Brown Ale, named after The Brotherhood Lounge. A quarter of every pint sold of the last two beers goes to Thurston County charities. SafePlace benefits from the Brotherhood - and the popular downtown Olympia bar kicks in another 25 cents per pint. Helsing Junction Farmhouse Saison sales are part of the local causes program, too.

The history of the building, brewery owners Sara and Nate Reilly's history with their Darby's Café and the reason behind the Three Magnets name was covered when we announced the brewery this past spring. Also, look for a follow-up story on Three Magnet's menu on this blog soon.

Until then, drop by the downtown Olympia brewery and drink some science and history. And, while nobody has yet won a grant to explore brewer fringe theater - if such a grant comes to fruition - it's certain to be named after Pat Jansen. He makes science go down as easy as a Three Magnets classic British-style brew.

THREE MAGNETS BREWING CO., 600 Franklin St. SE, Suite 105, Olympia, threemagnetsbrewing.com

Filed under: New Beer Column, Olympia,

November 12, 2014 at 5:32pm

Denizens of the dark invade Wingman Brewers

Wingman Brewers will celebrate the release of its Stratofortress and Bourbon Barrel Stratofortress Belgian Strong Dark Ale style beers Nov. 22.

For Tacomans, there is something really cool about traveling through the streets at night, because once you arrive at your destination, you feel like an unstoppable force. You put your tire jack in the car, venture out into the dark, have your spine shattered by numerous potholes and finally you arrive alive - at your favorite bar. This is an unparalleled driving victory.

With shorter days and colder weather, Wingman Brewers wants to reward you for your heroics. The Tacoma Dome District brewery knows you need a malty, roasty, chocolatey barrel-aged hug - the warmest snuggle-buddy in all the land. High alcohol winter beers inside a brewery, with the Tacoma Link and Uber car service mere seconds away, most certainly will wash away axel repair anxiety.

In celebration of their Stratofortress and Bourbon Barrel Stratofortress Belgian Strong Dark Ale style beer releases, Wingman has created a mini festival of darkness and deliverance. In addition to Team Stratofortress, and hauling out its other dark beer goodness, Wingman has invited a few fellow "HELLO!" winter beers - some equally dark and strong as the Stratofortresses. Wingman calls the event Denizens of the Dark.

From 2-11 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22, Wingman will offer 16 dark ones: Stratofortress, Bourbon Barrel Stratofortress, Jack' o Fortress, Chocofortress, Bourbon Barrel Big Baby Flat Top, Bourbon Barrel P-51 Porter, Oak Aged Heavy Bevvy Scotch Ale, 2013 Stratofortress (limited bottle release) as well as Lost Abbey Bourbon Angels Share, Alesmith Speedway Stout, 2013 Dogfish Head World Wide Stout, 2013 The Bruery 6 Geese-A-Laying, Epic Brewing Big Bad Baptist, North Coast Old Stock, Pelican Barrel Aged Poire and 2013 Scaldis Noel.

Expect the dark, potent and complex Nov. 22. Some winter beers incorporate spices, such as cinnamon and nutmeg; others add coffee, molasses or chocolate; and many are aged in bourbon or wine barrels, creating a soft mouthfeel and adding notes of whiskey and vanilla. The one thing that all winter beer brewers seem to agree on is a high-alcohol level. You might feel like puffing out your chest after successfully navigating the streets to reach Wingman Brewers, but go easy on these very strong beers. Hitting a pothole the next day will be excruciating after the morning's Death Bongo Band five-hour concert in your head.

DENIZENS OF THE DARK, 2-11 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 22, Wingman Brewers, 509 1/2 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, $7 gets you a commemorative Cthulhu snifter and your first pour, 253.256.5240

Filed under: New Beer Column, Tacoma,

November 12, 2014 at 10:41am

Beer Here: Three Magnets opens, Coast to Coast Toast, Tacoma New West CDA ...

There are people inside Three Magnets Brewing Co. in downtown Olympia! Photo courtesy of Facebook

Cold? Yes, I noticed. But that's one of the many reasons we have beer. Get to it. ...

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 12

Three Magnets Brewing Co. (600 Franklin St. SE, Olympia) has opened the bar section of its giant venture. Those 21 and older may enjoy a limited food menu and, of course, beers.

New Belgium Brewing will takeover the taps at Pint & Quarts Pub (1230 College St. SE, Lacey). Tickets for tastings are a dollar each, beginning at 6 p.m.

Seriously Puyallup River Alehouse? You couldn't wait until after Black Friday to host Chicago's Goose Island Beer Co.? The brewery's infamous Bourbon County Stout will be released the day after Thanksgiving, unleashing the imperial stout with a fearsome 14 percent alcohol content, aged in used bourbon barrels from places like Iowa's Templeton Rye, and hunted for by fans on their release dates like a Beautiful Angle poster. Oh well, Goose Island will bring its other beers and schwag to the downtown Puyallup alehouse from 6-9 p.m.

THURSDAY, NOV. 13

Thursday marks the official day (and night) of the Coast to Coast Toast. Vanberg & DeWulf, who founded the Coast to Coast Toast three years ago, was the first company to specialize in importing Belgian beers to the U.S. The principals of Vanberg & DeWulf (Don Feinberg and Wendy Littlefield) have been tireless champions for Belgian beer and now "honorary Belgians" all from independent family run producers. 99 Bottles (35002 Pacific Hwy. S., Federal Way) will raise a toast and feature the Vanberg & DeWuld portfolio, from 5-7 p.m.

The focus at The Forum in Puyallup (208 S. Meridian) will be Mac & Jack's IBIS IPA and Cascadian Dark Ale, beginning at 7 p.m. Two Seahawks tickets will be up for grabs, too.

The Copper Door (12 N. Tacoma Ave., Tacoma) hosts Full Sail Brewing Company out of Hood River, Oregon. Expect Cascade Pilsner, Wasail, Mathias's Main Ingredient Oatmeal Stout, Session Fest and others, besides a raffle from 6-8 p.m.

The ParkWay Tavern (313 N. I St., Tacoma) welcomes 10 Barrel Brewing Company from Bend, Oregon, and their Uberliner Berliner Weissbier, Power to the People American Stout, German Sparkle Party Berliner Weissbier, Apoxalypse IPA, among others, beginning at 5 p.m.

Randall alert! Top Rung Brewing Co. (8343 Hogum Bay Lane NE, Lacey) will runs its Prying Irons IPA through fresh hops beginning at 4 p.m.

SATURDAY, NOV. 15

Unless you have been living in a pothole, you know the Tacoma Art Museum busts out its Haub Family Collection of Western American Art and the museum expansion Saturday. TAM is celebrating the largest gift in the museum's 79-year history with an all-day and night party plus releasing a signature Harmon Brewing Co. ale and a Heritage Distilling Co. bourbon. Harmon's Tacoma New West CDA, a unique Cascadian dark ale brewed with six different malted barleys and chocolate wheat - which means it's black like a stout and the flavor is hoppy like an IPA. Tacoma New West CDA is sold in all Harmon Brewing locations, and a special limited edition will be available in the TAM Cafe. Heritage's Tacoma New West Bourbon Whiskey is a 92-proof bourbon aged less than two years with tones of caramel and vanilla, leaving a light sweetness in the high center of the palate and a smooth lingering finish.

Does the glass matter when tasting craft beer? That's the question Morso Wine Bar (9014 Peacock Hill Ave., Gig Harbor) will answer drinking beer from Spieglau's Pilsner glass, Hefe glass, IPA glass, Tulip glass, plus a typical pint glass, from 1-3 p.m. Reserve your $49 ticket at 253.530.3463.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 19

Iron Horse Brewery - the Ellensburg, Washington, brewery that loves to party - will bring a bunch of beer and schwag to The Swiss (1904 Jefferson Ave., Tacoma) from 6-9 p.m.

Puyallup River Alehouse (120 S. Meridian, Puyallup) hosts North Coast Brewing Company out of Fort Bragg, California, for a night of Blue Star Wheat Beer, Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout, Acme California IPA and other brews, plus schwag giveaways from 6-9 p.m.

THURSDAY, NOV. 20

Over by Pacific Lutheran University, beer geek Erick Swenson will offer a German beer sampler at 208 Garfield (208 Garfield, Parkland) for $6 a person, beginning at 6 p.m. 

November 10, 2014 at 7:19am

Served Blog Banner Boy: Q&A with bartender Nic Chmiel of Wingman Brewers

Nic Chmiel of Wingman Brewers knows the mechanics behind a good beer. Photo credit: Pappi Swarner

Every week we swap out the Served banner art above, introducing you to the people who serve food and drinks in the South Sound. This week, meet Nic Chmiel.

Server Banner Boy, Nov. 10-16, 2014

Nic Chmiel

Wingman Brewers in the Tacoma Dome District was all hustle and bustle last week with a bottling session in the back, including capping their Miss B-Haven Belgian-style Tripel. During the hubbub, the brewery left a mechanical engineer in charge. Nic Chmiel, who will soon head to Washington State University to finish his engineering degree, was pouring beers and holding court in the Wingman taproom. Chmiel grew up in BJ's Restaurant and Brewhouses, including California, Southcenter and South Hill. He's been surrounded by beers his entire service stint.

Why do you serve?

"Ha ha why not? I get to work hours that match my lifestyle. I get to meet some really cool people and just bullshit with them all night. The camaraderie between other service workers is out of this world. The pay is good enough to get me through school and pay my rent. And, at the end of it all, I get to serve people something that I am passionate about and enjoy being around for 10 hours a day. What more could you possibly ask for?"

Who is your favorite server in the South Sound?

"See ... now this is tough. There are a lot of nameless faces at that one place I went to that one time or other that are awesome. There are some out-of-this-world servers in the South Sound - it's impossible to pin it down. I would have to answer with: ‘anyone that is seriously passionate about what they do.' It shows, and it can make or break your dining-drinking experience. Nobody wants to saddle up to a bar and the bartender clearly just does not want to be there.??"

What are you most proud to serve?

"Authentic, well-crafted Tacoma ales."

What's your current drink of choice?

"OOOOOH ... This summer I have really been turned on to sours. It's a tough thing to find, but if I can get into a bar that has a sour beer, that's my go to. If not, next step is to look for a craft porter. Cannot go wrong there. If that fails, any craft beer on draft. And, if by chance, I stumble into a place that does not have craft beer at all, then probably a whiskey sour. Ha ha or I leave. ..."

Favorite movie?

"Easy - Pulp Fiction. I am a huge Tarantino fan. I don't have a TV, but I have probably seen Django like ten times too."

What don't you serve?

"Minors and drunks. Besides that, I have probably just about seen it all."

What's on your radar at Wingman Brewers?

"Definitely our upcoming 'Denizens of the Dark' event on November 22. I love me a big, heavy beer and this event is nothing but that. Just HUGE winter beers. And a lot of them. We will also be releasing bottles of our Stratofortress and Bourbon Barrel Aged Stratofortress, and you can bet a handful of those bad boys are headed home with me."

LINK: Meet other South Sound servers

November 5, 2014 at 8:18am

Beer Here: 1111 Fest, Point Defiance Tap and Grill opens, Ron Pattinson, Goose Island Beer Co. ...

Point Defiance Tap and Grill opens in Ruston Thursday, Nov. 6. Photo courtesy of Facebook

You've picked up the candy wrappers off your lawn, lit a candle for your beloved deceased relatives and have your sights, and stomach, on Thanksgiving. Some people think Thanksgiving and they think Macy's Day Parade and the National Dog Show and Leon Lett. No doubt, those are important parts. But I'm always fixated on the most beautiful part of Thanksgiving, the story of the Pilgrims landing on Plymouth Rock because they ran out of beer. There's ample time to tell that tale before Turkey Day. My palate has started to shed its hoppy skin for a winter molting. All I can think about are the rich, dark flavors of beers, and maybe a cardigan with elbow patches. Let's get to this week's South Sound beer events.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 5

Are you enjoying 1111 Fest? Don't act you don't know the Peterson Bros. 1111 joint on Hilltop Tacoma has hosted a different brewery since Saturday night. Tonight, cool cat Keith Carpenter of Mac & Jack's Brewery will chat with the beards, followed by Lagunitas Thursday, 7 Seas Brewing Friday, Elysian Saturday and others up to the big party on 11/11.

THURSDAY, NOV. 6

Look for the signs: Northwest microbrews and wines, cheese and charcuterie boards, locally-sourced grass-fed beef burgers from Heritage Meats, cheese and charcuterie boards, local farm produce from Calendula Farms and others, cheese and charcuterie boards ... Bill Bonnie is in Ruston. Bonnie, owner of Tacoma Wine Merchants and connected Enoteca Wine Bar in the Stadium District, has been searching and fighting Tacoma for years for a spot to open his Northwest centric upscale pub meets bistro concept. A former antique store next to the former blues club Coles in the town of Ruston is where he and his business partner, Donn Frostad of North Slope Construction, landed. After many months of renovation, the Point Defiance Tap and Grill will open Thursday for lunch and dinner.

Are you young? Are you professional? Yeah, apparently neither am I, but that doesn't mean I can't tell you about the Young Professionals Network Wingman Brewers Tour at 6 p.m. The YPN claim they're the next generation of community leaders valuing leadership, philanthropy, networking and fun. And you can experience all four of their values as you tour Wingman Brewers, taste a flight of seven to eight beers, at network. The cost is $17, $20 for those without a membership card. If you have a drive to succeed in business, a passion for serving the community and a love for tasty brew, this is your Thursday night.

If you're a member of Harmon Brewing's Mug Club, then you know you have been summoned for a Steep and Deep Winter Ale first tasting at 6 p.m. in the Harmon Tap Room. Bonus for members: A chance to purchase one of 180 hand-bottled Super Samurai Barley Wine, signed and numbered by Harmon head brewer Jeff Carlson.

FRIDAY, NOV. 7

Yes, yes, South Sound, our IPAs are delicious hits of orange, grapefruit, grass and pine courtesy of hops such as Cascade, Centennial and Columbus growing in our backyard. In Colorado, specifically Fort Collins, they do IPAs with Calypso and Mosaic hops, relatively new varieties first released to the public around 2011. The two hops color the beer with peaches, grapefruit, mango, lemon and blueberry. Chef Gabriel Cabrera will pair these hop flavors of New Belgium Brewing's Rampant Imperial IPA with cilantro curry chicken and Thai chili sauce, teriyaki beef and sweet soy sauce over sushi rice. So yum. Chef Gabriel has three other courses and four other New Belgium brews scheduled for a 6-9 p.m. dinner at Salty's at Redondo. Grab $68 and call 253.946.0636 right now.

SATURDAY, NOV. 8

Beer historian and beer travel writer Ron Pattinson will drop by Narrows Brewing at 3 p.m. to discuss beer history and his new book, The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer: Rediscovered Recipes for Classic Brews Dating from 1800 to 1965. For years, the England-born-turned-Amsterdam resident has gobbled up obscure books on beer history - including brewery logbooks - and in 2007 began sharing his findings in a conversational pub tone on his blog. Read more about Pattinson here.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 12

Seriously Puyallup River Alehouse? You couldn't wait until after Black Friday to host Chicago's Goose Island Beer Co.? The brewery's infamous Bourbon County Stout will be released the day after Thanksgiving, unleashing the imperial stout with a fearsome 14 percent alcohol content, aged in used bourbon barrels from places like Iowa's Templeton Rye, and hunted for by fans on their release dates like a Beautiful Angle poster. Oh well, Goose Island will bring its other beers and schwag to the downtown Puyallup alehouse from 6-9 p.m.

November 3, 2014 at 10:47am

Peterson brothers and 7 Seas Brewing collaborate on The Galley food truck

The Galley food truck will open Tuesday, Nov. 4 serving afternoon and evening meals at 7 Seas Brewing in Gig Harbor. Courtesy photo

Inspiration can take many forms, not the least common of which are pints of beer and a lazy Friday evening. Of course, the problem with these alcohol-induced epiphanies is that they're usually either, one, really stupid ideas, or two, quickly forgotten in favor of pizza and the sofa. There is the rare exception, however, and that is where our story begins.

It was June of 2014, and two men wearing life jackets stood above left field. While best friends wrestled over foul balls, groins were scratched and a giant fuzzy big-eyed reindeer punk'd grandmothers, these two life jacket-wearing guys, drinking IPAs, had a moment - an authentic human connection producing a deep stare, an "a-ha" moment, followed by juicy, unfiltered spiritual nourishing rush to the head.

They took another sip of 7 Seas Brewing Life Jacket Session IPA.

Then paused.

The two businessmen knew some ideas float while others sink like lead to the bottom.

They stared at each other's life jackets.

Sometimes you just have to allow that something grand and good might actually be born while wearing a life jacket ... while drinking beer ... beer named after a life jacket.

And sometimes that something ends up being a food truck.

That fateful night at Cheney Stadium, during 7 Seas Brewing's Life Jacket Session IPA release party, the brewery's co-owner Mike Runion and Tacoma restaurant and bar Peterson Bros. 1111 co-owner Justin Peterson considered partnering on a food truck.

"A week later Mike called me and asked if I was serious," says Peterson. "I said, ‘hell yes!'"

"We sat down and decided in one day that it was a great idea," explains Runion. "We drove up to Seattle because we knew a guy who was selling a food truck but the previous buyer backed out. We bought it that day. It happened that fast."

Then, the waiting game began. The permits needed to be acquired. Runion and Peterson also had huge projects of their own in the final stages. Runion and 7 Seas forged a partnership with 253 Heart owner Steve Naccarato to produce the 253 Pilsner coupled with a benefitting nonprofit program. The beer cans needed to be designed and distribution nailed down. Peterson, with his business partner and twin brother, Robby, forged a partnership with Tacoma's X Group Restaurants to remodel Red's Valley Pub down the street from the Tacoma Dome. The Valley's menu was still in the works, a beer garden was unfinished and taxidermy still needed to be secured.

"My business partner and head brewer, Travis Guterson, and I have a huge respect for what Justin and Robby created on Hilltop Tacoma," says Runion. "The way they run their business is similar to how we like to do things. They're detail-oriented, but it's super relaxed with amazing service. And the food is absolutely on point, which can surprise people who judge the joint as divey."

The truck, dubbed The Galley, extends 7 Seas' nautical theme. WrapJax wrapped the giant truck to resemble a wooden pirate ship, including portholes.

The truck will be parked in the huge parking lot in front of the 7 Seas brewery, serving lunch and nighttime meals, beginning Tuesday, Nov. 4. The truck will operate 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4-9 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday. Chef Roger Weatherhead is in command of the vessel.

>>> Chef Roger Weatherhead in The Galley. Photo courtesy of Facebook

"The menu will be different than Eleven Eleven or The Valley," says Peterson. "I knew instantly who should run the truck's kitchen. I've known Roger Weatherhead since he was helping us in the kitchen at the old Hotel Bar & Grill. He's seasoned in food trucks."

"I actually met Robby Peterson while working at the Spaghetti Factory, before the Hotel Bar & Grill," says Weatherhead, who grew up in Tumwater, and subscribes to the Peterson brother's bearded way of life.

After the Hotel Bar & Grill, which was owned by The Swiss partnership in the early 2000s, Weatherhead worked in several SeaTac hotel kitchens, Point Defiance Zoo's catering program, and eventually followed a friend to the Flair Taco truck in Seattle's Fremont neighborhood.

"The taco truck was hard work. The hours were strenuous, but it was fun," says Weatherhead. "Feeding drunk people at the end of the night was crazy fun."

Weatherhead got tired of the drunks, and eventually was hired on with Where Ya At Matt, Matthew Lewis' popular Seattle Cajun food truck.

"Last year when I was working for them, Eater named it the number nine truck in the country," says Weatherhead. "They did numbers I didn't know you could do on a food truck. They had a good system set up. And they had a menu where people didn't just want to order one thing. Some people ordered a sandwich, side and dessert. I learned a lot from them."

Weatherhead also worked for the famous Skillet truck, as well as ran Seattle's The Grilled Cheese Experience truck for a summer while the owner tended to his new baby.

"Then, I walked into Eleven Eleven this summer and next thing I know ... I'm running the kitchen in The Galley," says Weatherhead.

A wooden ship-inspired behemoth first draws you in, but Weatherhead plans to have you as an anchor customer with his gourmet take on classics. During the day, expect sandwiches, soups and salads "with twists," Weatherhead says.

"If all goes as planned, I will serve a housemade lamb chorizowith sofrito de tomato and shaved Manchego. It's simple. A classic play on the meatball sub," he says.

He wants to serve a crispy pork belly BLT with heirloom tomatoes and butter lettuce. He wants to hand customers a Caesar with butter lettuce, housemade dressing, crouton and marinated white anchovies called boquerones. "Romaine has taken iceberg's place," he laughs.

"At Skillet, I would make myself a sandwich with just boquerones," he says. "I probably had the worst breath, but I didn't care. They are so delicious."

"We want a steady lunch menu that people could depend on," says Runion. "The Peterson Brothers and Roger are sandwich experts, so we'll have three to five sandwiches, some soup and a couple salads."

For the first couple of weeks, the lunch menu will also be featured during the night session, with the possibility of an additional menu item or two.

Eventually, the night session could feature an entirely new menu.

"We want to add tacos or Mexican-inspired dishes for a couple nights. Then, another couple nights cook up bratwursts and sausages. We don't want to be pigeon-holed in one type of cuisine," says Runion. "We'll also have a nightly badass charcuterie plate with local cheese, local salamis and other items. Beer, sausage, cheese and bread - I could live on that."

Weatherhead will ease into the nightly specials, adding shareable bar snacks such as pretzels with beer mustard, the charcuterie plate Runion has in mind, mussels with beer and candied bacon. He's also eager to cook with 7 Seas beers.

7 SEAS BREWING, food truck 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4-9 p.m., Tuesday-Sunday,  the brewery 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday-Tuesday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 3006 Judson St., Gig Harbor, 253.514.8129

SEE ALSO

7 local beer secrets leaned at 7 Seas Brewing Life Jacket Session IPA rollout

Photos from the re-opening of The Valley Pub by the Tacoma Dome

October 29, 2014 at 11:44am

Beer Here: Reporter report, The Queen's Peach, Ill-Tempered Gnome, Halloween beer parties ...

Wingman Brewers' The Queen's Peach is on sale at Western Washington Metropolitan Markets.

REPORTER REPORT

Dick's Brewing Company turned 20 this weekend and had a big ol' birthday bash to celebrate at their Centralia brewery and tap room. The duck hunting camouflage was donned and the beer was flowing - in addition to classic pours such as their Dick Danger Ale and their I.P.A., a few new 2014 beers were available for the drinking, including the Reporter Red Ale, brewed in honor of The Chronicle newspaper's 125th anniversary of serving the folks in Lewis County. Head Brewer Dave Pendleton brewed the Northwest-style Red Ale with hops in mind more than malt, incorporating Washington state hops Cascade, Centennial, Magnum and Columbus. It's not overly bitter, with citrus and pine notes. I also enjoyed Dick's Midnight Ride Black IPA as Top Rung Brewing's Mike Besser (BrewDad.com) and I shouted over the Backfire Band. Rich and dark like a porter, Cascade and Centennial hopped as a Northwest IPA, the CDA-style beer has a smoky finish and lively carbonation. Congrats Dick's!

THE QUEEN'S PEACH

Metropolitan Market had peaches - big, juicy, slurpalicious mothas so fabulous that they have their own month. Since 1996, Metropolitan Market has collected the peach bounty from Pence Orchards in Wapato, Washington and organic growers Frog Hollow Farm in Brentwood, California. And every August, Diamond Princess, O'Henry, Summerset and several other peach varieties receive the royal treatment from Met Market's produce managers, including the Proctor District store. Of course, not all peaches make the cut. Metropolitan unloaded more than 100 pounds of bruised peaches in Wingman Brewers' loading dock, asking the Tacoma brewery to turn them into beer for all their stores. Head Brewer Ken Thoburn brewed the peaches with bourbon, Madagascar vanilla beans and cinnamon sticks, producing a beer that could replace your Thanksgiving dessert, if you like your dessert ringing in at 8.5 percent alcohol by volume. Head to Met Market in Proctor, marvel at the remodel and grab some peach cobbler disguised as 22-ounce bottles.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 29

Seattle's Elysian Brewing is the pumpkin king of the Northwest, brewing 13 different pumpkin beers and just hosted its 10th massive pumpkin brew festival that draws entrants from as far away as Europe. Puyallup River Alehouse will allow Elysian to take over its taps, including this year's pumpkin beers, such as the Punkuccino ale with a short shot of Stumptown coffee, cinnamon and nutmeg. Giveaways and raffles will be part of the action from 6-9 p.m.

The ParkWay Tavern teams up with Avery Brewing for a "Night of Darkness," featuring such Avery beasts as Mephistopheles, Samaels, The Reverend, Salvation, 2012 Hog Heaven, Rumpkin, Pump[KY], Trogdor the Burninator at The Beast, to name a few. It will get dark around 5 p.m.

Three Magnets Brewing Co. is busy pushing out kegs as work continues on their much-anticipated brewery and brewpub, slated to open next month at 600 Franklin St. in downtown Olympia. As you might have heard, Three Magnets is the brainchild of Nathan and Sara Reilly, who also own Darby's Café in downtown Olympia. Dillingers Cocktails & Kitchen - the beautiful speakeasy serving pre-Prohibition cuisine and carefully researched, era-appropriate drinks crafted by bartender Sherilyn Lightner - will host Three Magnets head brewer Pat Jansen and the brewery's latest brews from 4-7 p.m.

THURSDAY, OCT. 30

Oakshire Brewing has unleashed its Ill-Tempered Gnome, an American brown ale with chocolate malt and a snappy bitter, hoppy finish. Fingers crossed this winter seasonal will be on tap at The Copper Door when the beer store and tap room hosts the Eugene, Oregon brewery beginning at 6 p.m. Prizes will be doled out for best costume and best beer-related costume, such as an Ill-Tempered Gnome.

The Spar in Old Town Tacoma hosts a Deschutes Brewing brewer's Night from 7-9 p.m. A spotlight will shine on the Bend, Oregon, brewery's Reserve Series' "Not the Stoic," a Belgian-styled quad that was aged and sequestered in rye whiskey and Pinot Noir barrels, resulting in a complex flavor that is an entirely new rendition - with a nod to the original "The Stoic," which was released in 2011.

FRIDAY, OCT. 31

Nothing with pumpkin tastes good above 70 degrees. With a high of 56 predicted for Halloween day, Puyallup River Alehouse's Halloween Pumpkin Beer Party should be a smashing success.Expect to drinkPuyallup River Jack O'Lahar, Puyallup River Black Pumpkin Saison, Puyallup River Gourdy Wow!, Elysian Dark O The Moon, Elysian The Great Pumpkin, Elysian Punkuccino, Elysian Night Owl, Doc's Draft Hard Pumpkin Cider, Dogfish Head Punkin, Bainbridge Island Pumpkin, Southern Tier Pumking and others from 3 p.m. to midnight.

If adult trick-or-treating were a thing, what would you hand out? Probably beer, at least that's what Pint Defiance has on the docket. Beginning at 5 p.m., the specialty beer store and taproom will tap rare pumpkin beers from Almanac, Bale Breaker, Elysian, 21st Amendment and others. The first 100 customers to order a pumpkin beer will walk away with a treat bag full of candy, prizes and beer schwag.

Narrows Brewing Co. will host its Hoppy Halloween Party, shining a spotlight on the new Coffee Cardamom Stout, a collaboration beer with Northern Pacific Coffee Company and Mad Hat Tea Company, beginning at dusk. Ice Cream Social created a Coffee Cardamom Stout ice cream flavor and will serve it during the party as well as beer floats with other flavors. Food trucks will park out front. A costume contest with a $100 gift card prize for the winner will begin at 8:30 p.m.

Comeback Sports hosts its Halloween party at Wingman Brewers featuring a dance party with DJ, costume contest with prizes, food truck outside, pumpkin beer and cider and, well, more beer. The party kicks off at 9 p.m. with a $5 admission; $20 includes five Wingman beers.

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Served, a blog by the Weekly Volcano, is the region’s feedbag of fresh chow daily, local restaurant news, New Beer Column, bar and restaurant openings and closings, breaking culinary news and breaking culinary ground - all brought to the table with a dollop of Internet frivolity on top.

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